Learning to Ring at Bradoc and St Winnow

Comparison of the sizes of St Mary the Virgin Bradoc and St Winnow Bells

Bell number

 

 

 

 

Founder

St Mary Bradoc

St Winnow

Weight

Note

Diameter

Dated

 

1

 

3-1-19

G#

23.75"

1845

Charles & George Mears

2

 

3-2-11

F#

25.25"

1845

Charles & George Mears

3

 

3-2-16

E#

25.50"

1845

Charles & George Mears

 

1

3-3-17

Fx

26.00"

1899

Mears & Stainbank

 

2

3-3-3

E#

27.00"

1771

J III, C IV, & W Pennington & Co

4

 

4-1-26

D#

28.50"

1845

Charles & George Mears

5

 

4-2-16

C#

29.50"

1845

Charles & George Mears

 

3

4-3-2

D#

28.50"

1790

C IV & J IV Pennington

 

4

5-2-10

Cx

31.00"

1864

G Mears and Company

 

5

6-1-6

B#

33.00"

1754

Christopher III Pennington

 

6

9-0-6

A#

36.75"

1771

J III, C IV, & W Pennington & Co

There are six bells at St Winnow, four cast by Penningtons, famous local Cornish bell founders around 250 years ago, in the 18th century, the other two being cast by Whitechapel foundry in the nineteenth century.

The five bells at Bradoc were cast in the Nineteenth century as a complete ring, using the bell metal from the old ring of four, which were cast by Beckham and Penningtons in the sixteenth and seventeenth century.

Whitechapel foundry have cast other famous bells including Big Ben, the Liberty bell, and the Olympic bell which is 100 times more heavy than Bradoc tenor, or 50 times more heavy than St Winnows tenor!

Why are you taught to learn at Bradoc?

As we can see from the table above the tenor at Bradoc is almost exactly half the weight of the tenor at St Winnow and they also have a much shorter rope length up to the bells.  This means that it is much easier to ring the Bradoc bells when you are first learning and therefore you will learn much more quickly. 

Also the bells at Bradoc have a computer simulator, which enables you to practice many ringing techniques with the bell silenced and the computer simulating what you are ringing.  You can if you want simulate how you would ring on the 12 bells at Truro Cathedral or any where else ringing with 6, 8 10 12 or even 16 bells amongst virtual ringers!

Our hope is that you will learn so that you are able to ring for Sunday worship but that you will also enjoy ringing for practices and at outings and other occasions.

The aim is to make learning to ring interesting, fun and as quick as possible.

We will guide you through the levels of proficiency, which will mean that you will become a competent ringer who is able to ring the early stages of method ringing and to enable you to ring up and down competently in peal, and take part in any of the three traditions of ringing in the towers of this benefice.

You may wish to join the ITTS teaching scheme and if you do you will be given access to an online learning to ring resource, which will help you through the early stages.

If not you will still receive the same care and attention that we give all our learners.

There is a strong tradition of bell ringing in this area all going back some five hundred years.  If we were to meet some of those who fought in the Civil War around Bradoc Church, and they were ringers then, they would ring exactly as we ring now.  Some would ring rounds, some call changes and some would ring the same methods, plain bob, grandsire etc that we ring today at Bradoc.

You will find that the traditions of raising to rounds, call changes and method ringing are still practiced today respectively in Lanlivery, Lostwithiel and St Veep and in St Winnow; and Bradoc.  Our aim is to enable you to ring in any of these traditions and to be at home in each tower.

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